4 Smart Eating Tips from Shape Up Montana

April 1, 2014 @ 3:13 pm by guest

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This article was provided by Shape Up Montana.  Shape Up Montana is a fun, interactive three-month team competition from February 1 — May 1 that encourages Montanans to develop healthy physical activity and eating habits.  Find out more information and plan to get signed up for the program next year! 

 

These four Food4Fuel healthy eating strategies can help anyone eat better, feel better and perform better at work, in school and on the playing field.

1)  Fuel Regularly

Skipping meals to lose weight does not work. That is because when you get over-hungry, you over-eat. It’s also hard to make smart choices when you are hungry and every food looks appealing. Always eat breakfast – and then eat every three to four hours throughout the day.

2)  Fuel Carefully

You put the right stuff – gasoline and oil – into your car. You feed your dog and cat the right food for their size and age. Your own body deserves that same kind of careful fueling. Having an eating plan, like DASH or MyPlate, is a smart way to have the right foods on hand whenever you get hungry.

3)  Fuel Tastefully

The number one reason why we choose certain foods over others is taste. Boring, bland food is not satisfying and we often eat more than we would if our meals were flavorful. Upgrading your culinary skills – with a class, cookbook or website – can actually help you eat less and enjoy it more.

4)  Fuel Mindfully

Although you rarely hear this as a ‘diet’ tip, paying attention to your meals is one of the best ways to improve your eating habits. Slowly down and enjoying your food increases satisfaction. Eating mindfully helps to reduce stress snacking – and allows you to eat when hungry and stop when satisfied.

 

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By Dayle Hayes for Shape Up Montana.  Dayle Hayes is an award-winning author and educator and a sought-after speaker across the USA.  She collected school success stories for Making It Happen, a joint CDC-USDA project, wrote a chapter on communicating with students in Managing Child Nutrition Programs: Leadership for Excellence, and co-authored the Position of the American Dietetic Association: Nutrition Guidance for Healthy Children Ages 2 to 11 Years.

Photo Credit: SodanieChea via Compfight cc


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